Thursday, February 7, 2013

Speaking at Mt.Airy Library on WORLD BUILDING

I'll be speaking at Mt.Airy Library this Saturday, Feb. 9th, 2013 at 1pm! And if you are in Maryland I hope you can join me.


Mount Airy Branch Library
705 Ridge Avenue
Mount Airy, MD 21771



The world we create for our characters should be vivid, complete and reflect a piece of ours.

World Building ... my way

I once participated in a Sci-Fi critique group, where one of the authors asked about World Building. Our leader never expanded on this topic. When this topic was bought up, I pondered what I did when I build the many worlds I create for my books.

I believe everyone has their own methods. However, here are some of mine that help me throughout the process.

EXPOSE YOURSELF TO EARTH AND ITS WONDERS

I love to travel, as I have mentioned many times before. Traveling and exposing yourself to different wonders of our world can be a catalyst for the creation of your new world.

STUDY THE WORLD AROUND YOU

If traveling is not possible, or even if it is, take time to study and observe your surroundings. Things that may not seem interesting initially can become an integral part of the world you create. When you are walking, or touring areas take your time, allow your imagination to go beyond the obvious and ask yourself many questions. For example, when I am flying in an airplane, I ask myself, “What if the clouds were black, blue, grey?” What if the sun was white? Or lower to the ground? What if the plants had fingers? Push yourself to expand on the world around you.

RESEARCH AND MAKE NOTE

I do a lot of research on the internet. Truth be told, I don’t do a lot of reading, I just look at pictures. I tend to look at pictures for a long time, and sit back and see if it fits into my world.

I note what extremes I want my world to have.

I note what rules my world should have.

I note what kind of species could live in that world.

How would a human sustain this environment?

Should I create something artificial in order to allow my humans to live here?

DRAW IT OUT

I draw out parts of my world or cut out pictures of places or things that fit in the world I am starting to create.

DECIDE WHAT TO REVEAL ABOUT YOUR WORLD

I tend to create this elaborate world, and then I take out a lot of the microscopic pieces that I believe the reader can fill in. However, I give the backdrop in the world the reader creates. I note the rules for that world, its species, animals and weaknesses.

USE OTHER RESOURCES AND BUILD UPON THEM

Research other mythological worlds, and change them, pervert them or and enhance them to fit your characters needs.

FILL IN THE RULES

Address the main guidepost of your world. How is it powered? Is it advanced? Is it rugged? What’s the climate? What does the land look like? Does it has a sun or moon? Are there animals there? What are the major species?

HOW DOES YOUR CHARACTER FIT IN?

Note how your character fits into this world? Are they from here? Do they visit? How do they survive? Communicate with the species on this planet?


When I world build it comes natural to me, because I’ve always loved science and like to spend time pondering its wonders. However, taking notes, going exploring, drawing it out, and making DA RULES has helped me greatly in creating the worlds in my novels.

3 comments:

Mardel said...

good post. Tonight my granddaughter was drawing a picture and as she was drawing, she was telling a little about the world. Not the picture..but the world the picture was set in. For instance, there were two moons. The cool thing about this, is that she is only five..well, she turns six in a week. She's in kindergarden and we've been reading books for years with her, but I don't recall anything with two moons. It's wonderful to see her imagination and the very beginnings of a world building going on as she was drawing - even if she didn't realize just how amazing the world she was creating. Your post reminded me of those fun 10 minutes. If I had a paper I would have taken notes. As it is, I think I'm going to try to remember some of what she was telling me....

Diane Carlisle said...

I think drawing it out is really good advice for me. I have this idea in my head of my setting and I just can't wrap my head around it enough to give the details.

I think I'll try drawing it out on paper to see if I can get a better feel for it. I used to search for photos on Google, but that only helps so much. I get ideas of other people's settings, not really of my own.

Great post!

LM Preston said...

Thanks you all. World building is the fun part of development of a story I think.